Fake news, conspiracy theories and alternate truth are easy to take roots nowadays thanks to development in modes of communications and social media. The irony: It is the educated people who promote these. Here are some prime examples: A 2016 survey by Chapman University showed more than half of Americans believe that the government is withholding facts about 9/11. There is a widespread belief that the Twin Towers fell because of expertly placed explosives and many say it was a false flag attack to validate war with the Middle East. In reality it took Al-Qaeda years of planning and training to carry out the attacks. Same was case when the US doctors declared the country’s first Ebola case in Sept 2014 after the outbreak in West Africa. Some suggested that the deadly virus was purposely allowed to spread so that the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention could patent a vaccine. 52 people were killed in London on July 7, 2005 by four suicide bombers who targeted Underground metro and a double-decker bus. But an incorrect report initially filed by a journalist from The Guardian led to conspiracy theories like the British Muslim bombers were framed by the government to justify the war in Iraq. A totally unfounded charge, just like the allegation that Iraq had Weapons of Mass Destruction in its possession. The Nazis systematically murdered six million Jewish people and there are 3,000 tons of German paperwork that outline it all. But a survey by the Anti-Defamation League says two-thirds of the world’s population hadn’t heard of the Holocaust or think it never happened. Not surprisingly those from Middle East and. North Africa are the most likely to be doubters.